Bitsy Words: Thanks for the Trouble by Tommy Wallach

18th Apr 2016 Jess @ Gone with the Words 2016, Bitsy Words, Reviews, Reviews by Jess

Bitsy Words: Thanks for the Trouble by Tommy Wallach

Bitsy Words: Thanks for the Trouble by Tommy WallachThanks for the Trouble by Tommy Wallach
Narrator: Francisco Pryor Garat
Published by Simon & Schuster Audio
Pub Date: February 23rd 2016
Length: 6 hrs and 24 mins
Format: Audiobook | Source: Publisher
Genres: Contemporary, Young Adult
Buy the book! | Goodreads
3 Stars

Tommy Wallach, the New York Times bestselling author of the “stunning debut” (Kirkus Reviews, starred review) We All Looked Up, delivers a brilliant new novel about a young man who overcomes a crippling loss and finds the courage to live after meeting an enigmatic girl.

“Was this story written about me?”
I shrugged.
“Yes or no?”
I shrugged again, finally earning a little scowl, which somehow made the girl even more pretty.
“It’s very rude not to answer simple questions,” she said.
I gestured for my journal, but she still wouldn’t give it to me. So I took out my pen and wrote on my palm.
I can’t, I wrote. Then, in tiny letters below it: Now don’t you feel like a jerk?

Parker Santé hasn’t spoken a word in five years. While his classmates plan for bright futures, he skips school to hang out in hotels, killing time by watching the guests. But when he meets a silver-haired girl named Zelda Toth, a girl who claims to be quite a bit older than she looks, he’ll discover there just might be a few things left worth living for.

From the celebrated author of We All Looked Up comes a unique story of first and last loves.

At the beginning of Thanks for the Trouble I thought we were going to have ourselves a manic-pixie-dream-girl situation on our hands, and while I’m not one to mind them as much as others, I do find them tiresome sometimes. What I ended up getting was more of a mix between a John Green novel, Tuck Everlasting, and Age of Adaline, which was not a bad thing at all.

I liked the story and thought the character of Parker was done very well. Parker has selective mutism and is pretty withdrawn and Zelda definitely helps him come closer to overcoming that. I was not expecting Zelda’s character to turn out to be more than an eccentric teenage girl, but I think that aspect added a nice surprise. I think the reason I didn’t love the book though was that I didn’t feel an emotional connection to these characters. There’s a thing that happens at the end that should have left me sad, but instead I didn’t feel anything. I loved the wonderfully written prose and that Parker is latino because we don’t see that a lot. There’s also a lot of mini-adventures that happen throughout the story that I thought were really fun.

Audiobook Notes

What really made this book for me was the narration by Francisco Pryor Garat. His accent really brought Parker to life. He had perfect timing and read at the perfect speed. (I usually have to speed up most narrators because they read too slowly.) I hope he decides to narrate more books!

 

 

Jess @ Gone with the Words

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