Review: Every You, Every Me by David Levithan

15th Sep 2011 Jess @ Gone with the Words 2011, Reviews, Reviews by Jess

Review: Every You, Every Me by David LevithanEvery You, Every Me by David Levithan, Jonathan Farmer
Published by Knopf BfYR
Pub Date: September 13th 2011
Pages: 245
Format: ARC | Source: Publisher
Genres: Contemporary, Suspense, Young Adult
Buy the book! | Goodreads
4 Stars

In this high school-set psychological tale, a tormented teen named Evan starts to discover a series of unnerving photographs—some of which feature him. Someone is stalking him . . . messing with him . . . threatening him. Worse, ever since his best friend Ariel has been gone, he's been unable to sleep, spending night after night torturing himself for his role in her absence. And as crazy as it sounds, Evan's starting to believe it's Ariel that's behind all of this, punishing him. But the more Evan starts to unravel the mystery, the more his paranoia and insomnia amplify, and the more he starts to unravel himself. Creatively told with black-and-white photos interspersed between the text so the reader can see the photos that are so unnerving to Evan, Every You, Every Me is a one-of-a-kind departure from a one-of-a-kind author.

Every You, Every Me…how to review you without spoiling anything…

I was surprised with what this book was really about. Not that it wasn’t about what is explained in the synopsis, but the other aspect of the story, Ariel herself. It was a good surprise, or not good, but rather I wasn’t expecting it and I liked the book more for it. I was excited about the idea of it being a photographic novel. A mystery needing to be solved and the photos being the clues. The photos were truly creepy sometimes!

I was not expecting it to be so emotional for me. I guess it comes from the fact that I know a girl like Ariel. And I know how it’s sometimes hard not see when someone needs help until it’s almost too late. Then questioning whether you did the right thing for this person, followed by anger at all the things they put you through, non-stop worry over one day being too late to help. Yeah. It touched home with me.

I feel like I’d give too much away by really going into detail with this story, so just know that it’s dark, and emotional, and really good. I will put this book in the same important category as Thirteen Reasons Why by Jay Asher, because I feel people can take away something important from it.

 

Jess @ Gone with the Words

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